Kitchen Translations

October 11th, 2015
Kitchen Translations | One Hour Translation

In the Spanish language there are a significant number of terms that will vary, depending on the regional flavor or country where they’re used.

Translating recipes can require some extensive research. You’ll need to look up appropriate gastronomy-related terminology and vocabulary so you will require a reliable, reputable culinary source of information; and it must be faithful to what’s used in each region or country, and in each language.

In the Spanish language there are a significant number of terms that will vary, depending on the regional flavor or country where they’re used. Here are some examples below -

  • frutilla vs fresa (strawberry)
  • Palta vs aguacate (avocado) 
  • piña vs ananá (pineapple) 
  • maní  vs cacahuate (peanut)
  • banana vs plátano vs guineo (banana)
  • papa vs patata (potato)
  • durazno vs melocotón (peach) 
  • pomelo vs toronja (grapefruit) 
  • choclo vs millo vs maíz vs elote (corn) 
  • pochoclo vs pororó vs palomitas or rosetas de maíz (popcorn)
  • torta vs pastel vs tarta vs bizcocho (cake) 
  • gaseosa vs refresco or soda (soft drink).

It’s not only the names of food items that differ in the same language: there are other words in the culinary jargon that also differ. Here are a couple of examples –

  • heladera vs refrigerador vs nevera (fridge)
  • mozo vs garzón vs mesero (waiter)

Communication with your Translation Client is Imperative

It’s really important when translating and localizing texts or recipes pertaining to cooking, that the translation client specifies the precise target audience and the region or country, because there are many, many ways of referring to the same product within the one language.

Besides the many databases available, if you do an online search you’ll find many websites devoted specifically to providing this kind of information. New topics are posted on a daily basis on these culinary forums, by home-cooks, professional chefs and foodies at large.

These forums, blogs, and specialty sites are often managed by experts in their field and can come in very handy: any reliable reference source is worth pursuing if it means that your final translation document is accurate and not confusing to the reader.