automatic translation

In works of science fiction like Star Trek or Doctor Who, one of the most commonly but curiously unremarked-upon SFnal aspects of the future or the advanced alien species is the ability to automatically translate any number (sometimes infinite) of languages automatically, using nothing but a small device (or, in the case of Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series, a fish in your ear). It’s not hard to see that even if it rarely takes centre stage, the idea of “automatic translation” is a powerful one that immediately catches the eye (or ear).

When you have a business and you wish to promote it online, the best way to go about it is create a website, post ads and submit content to other websites. This will help bring traffic to your site which in turn will boost your business and revenues. This has been the most common procedure for almost anyone who wants to boost their business. This is a good reliable procedure no doubt, but when you have a website that caters to the speakers of one language, it happens to limit the traffic that visits your website to the speakers of that language.

Limitations of automatic translation

In the previous part of the article we discussed what machine translation is and here we continue our discussion on the limitations of machine or automatic translation.

What is automatic translation?

Automatic or machine translation is the use of state of the art technology for translation of a text from one natural language to another without the intervention of human beings. With the advent of digital computers, it usually refers to using software tools that carry out the translation.

If weren't for the superiority of human translation over machine translation, then most companies would be relying on machine translators exclusively. At any rate, multinational enterprises need to realize sooner rather than later that professional translation is an expertise that should never be underestimated.